CONTINUE Viewing
TINA DiCARLO

By Size

Museum of Modern Art, New York | 2005

EXHIBITION Views

EXHIBITION Notes

CURATORIAL Statement

This exhibition renounced the curatorial hand in favour of a number of rules that determined an arrangement. It took the Museum's greatest asset -- it's architectural drawings collection -- and the greatest restraint in an exhibition -- the high cost of framing -- as a first set of principles. All works shown in the exhibition had been previously framed for other installation, and drawings were sorted by size. Maximum and minimum hanging heights were set within the gallery as well as a standard distance between works.

What revealed themselves in such a series of unplanned and random adjacencies were a number of themes and clandestine histories: Mies van der Rohe emerged as a datum within the collection and within modernist history as told by MoMA; the smallest work often those of the greatest utopian visions of megastructures; frames belied the Museum's preferences for some works over others as well as exhibition histories; works which had gone out of vogue were unearthed and exhibited.

The exhibition, which countered the meta-narrative in favour of emergent histories, was opened under the auspices of a salon-style salon-style summer installation.

Work: Curating
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